The word "Feverfew" derives from the Latin word febrifugia, meaning "fever reducer" or "to drive out fevers". Feverfew is a plant that is native to Asia Minor and the Balkans. It is now common throughout the world. Feverfew (Tanacetum parthenium) is a perennial plant belonging to the daisy family. This family grows in much of Europe, North America, and Canada. It has been used in herbal remedies for centuries. 

Feverfew leaves are normally dried for use in medicine. Fresh leaves and extracts are also used. The plant is also known as Altamira, Bachelor's Buttons, Chrysanthème Matricaire, Chrysanthemum parthenium, Featerfoiul, Featherfew, Featherfoil, Flirtwort Midsummer Daisy.

People take feverfew by mouth for the prevention and treatment of migraine headaches. People also take feverfew by mouth for fever, irregular menstrual periods, arthritis, a skin disorder called psoriasis, allergiesasthmaringing in the ears (tinnitus)dizziness, and nausea and vomiting. Some people take feverfew by mouth for difficulty getting pregnant or fathering a child (infertility). It is also taken by mouth for "tired blood" (anemia), cancer, common cold, earache, liver disease, prevention of miscarriage, muscular tension, bone disorders, swollen feet, diarrheaupset stomach, and intestinal gas.

Feverfew is sometimes applied directly to the gums for toothaches or to the skin to kill germs. It is also applied to the skin for itching and to prevent insect bites. Some people also use feverfew as a general stimulant and for intestinal parasites. Feverfew leaves contain many different chemicals, including one called parthenolide. Parthenolide or other chemicals decrease factors in the body that might cause migraine headaches. Feverfew is likely safe when taken by mouth appropriately in the short-term (up to four months). 

BENEFITS OF FEVERFEW

Possibly effective for preventing migraine headache

Some research using different feverfew products (Mig-RL, Naturveda-Vitro-Bio Research Institute, Issoire, France; LipiGesic M, PuraMed BioScience, Inc., Schofield, WI; GelStat Migraine, GelStat Corporation) shows that taking feverfew by mouth can reduce the frequency of migraine headaches and reduce pain, nausea, vomiting, and sensitivity to light and noise when they do occur. Feverfemay be more effective in people with more frequent migraine attacks. But there are some studies that concluded that feverfew doesn't work for migraines. The difference in results may be explained by the differences in feverfew products that were tested. The Canadian government allows manufacturers of a certain feverfew formulation (containing 0.2% of a chemical called parthenolide) to claim that their product can be used to prevent migraines. 

Though there are insufficient evidence to rate effectiveness for itching (pruritus), allergies, asthma, bone disorders, cancer, common cold, dizziness, earache, fever, intestinal parasites, liver disease, menstrual irregularities, miscarriage prevention, muscle tension, nausea, psoriasis, ringing in the ears, swollen feet, toothaches, upset stomach, vomiting, and other conditions. 

Relief of migraines/ headaches

Feverfew is believed to help migraine sufferers because of the unique plant chemical it contains, parthenolide. Parthenolide helps relieve smooth muscle spasms and can combat the widening of blood vessels that occurs in migraines. This effect appears to be backed up by research which shows that Feverfew can reduce the frequency of migraines and reduce symptoms such as nausea, vomiting, and sensitivity to light (flashing lights). 

According to

herbmed.org:

"It is the combination of ingredients in the Feverfew plant that brings such effective relief. It works to inhibit the release of two inflammatory substances, serotonin, and prostaglandins, both believed to contribute to the onset of migraines." "By inhibiting these amines as well as the production of the chemical histamine, the herb controls inflammation that constricts the blood vessels in the head, and prevents blood vessel spasms which may contribute to headaches". 

One particular study in the UK took a survey of 270 migraine sufferers. The study found that more than 70% of them felt significantly better after taking an average of 2 to 3 fresh Feverfew leaves daily. Several human studies have used this herb to prevent and treat migraines. Overall though, these studies suggest that Feverfew is best used as an aid for preventing migraines. 

Other Health Conditions

Though there are insufficient evidence to rate effectiveness for itching (pruritus), allergies, asthma, bone disorders, cancer, common cold, dizziness, earache, fever, intestinal parasites, liver disease, menstrual irregularities, miscarriage prevention, muscle tension, nausea, psoriasis, ringing in the ears, swollen feet, toothaches, upset stomach, vomiting, and other conditions. 

Menstrual Cramps

Menstrual cramps occur when the lining of the uterus makes large amounts of prostaglandins. When these cells break down during menstruation, the prostaglandins are released. They constrict the blood vessels in the uterus and make its muscle layer contract, causing painful cramps. Because Feverfew has been shown to reduce prostaglandin production, it may help ease menstrual cramps. 

Arthritis

Whilst there is conflicting evidence regarding the use of this herb to provide arthritis relief; Feverfew does possess potent anti-inflammatory properties, which help to prevent swelling and damage to the joints. There are a group of proteins known as NFkappaB that are a pro-inflammatory signaling pathway which is particularly associated with arthritis. Parthenolide, one of the powerful sesquiterpene lactones found in this herb, is responsible for the bioactive effects of Feverfew, acting as a NFkappaB inhibitor. By inhibiting the process of NFkappaB activation, the severity of the joint erosion can be reduced and the progression of arthritis can be prevented.

Feverfew also acts as an antioxidant. It protects the joint tissues against free radical damage and prevents damage to the membranes lining the surfaces of the bones. This reduces friction between the ends of 2 bones at a place where they meet to form a joint. This may help to provide long-term relief to persons suffering from arthritis. 

SIDE EFFECTS OF FEVERFEW

Side effects might include upset stomach, heartburn, diarrhea, constipation, bloating, flatulence, nausea, and vomiting. Other reported side effects include nervousness, dizziness, headache, trouble sleeping, joint stiffness, tiredness, menstrual changes, rash, pounding heart, and weight gain. Feverfew is possibly unsafe when fresh leaves are chewed. Chewing unprocessed feverfew leaves can cause mouth sores; swelling of the mouth, tongue, and lips; and loss of taste. 

PRECAUTIONS

Pregnancy and breast-feeding

Feverfew is possibly unsafe when taken by mouth during pregnancy. There is a concern that it might cause early contractions and miscarriage. Don't use feverfew if you are pregnant. There is not enough reliable information about the safety of taking feverfew if you are breastfeeding. Stay on the safe side and avoid use. 

Bleeding Disorders

Feverfew might slow blood clotting. In theory, taking feverfew could increase the risk of bleeding in some people. Until more is known, use feverfew cautiously if you have a bleeding disorder. 

Allergy to ragweed and related plants

Feverfemay cause an allergic reaction in people who are sensitive to the Asteraceae/Compositae plant family. Members of this family include ragweed, chrysanthemums, marigolds, daisies, and many others. If you have allergies, be sure to check with your healthcare provider before taking feverfew

Surgery

Feverfew might slow blood clotting. It might cause bleeding during and after surgery. Stop taking feverfew at least 2 weeks before a scheduled surgery.

FEVERFEW TEA BENEFITS 

This is a daisy-like flower, while the lemongrass is tall, citrusy grass. Together, these two ingredients combine to create a unique and flavorful herbal tea. Its leaves bear a citrus aroma, which makes it a perfect choice for pairing with lemongrass. As its name suggests, the long-bladed leaves of this plant offer a citrusy flavor, which makes it a favorite ingredient in Asian cuisine and a frequent substitute for lemons in cooking. Carefully balanced into a fresh herbal blend, feverfew & lemongrass tea offers an inviting scent and invigorating flavor with the tantalizing taste of citrus, one no tea shelf can be complete without. Feverfew and lemongrass is an uncommon blend that is only offered by a few herbal tea merchants like Buddha Teas.

FEVERFEW FOR MIGRAINE 

Feverfew is used as a preventive (or prophylactic) treatment for migraine. Several people have reported that after taking feverfew, their migraine attacks have gradually become less frequent and in a few cases have stopped altogether, but evidence regarding benefit is conflicting. When the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) reviewed all treatments for migraine (in 2012 and 2016), they did not recommend Feverfew as a migraine preventive. They found that the studies looking at its effect were of low quality and had serious limitations, which meant they could not find evidence required to make a recommendation.

Some research using different feverfew products (Mig-RL, Naturveda-Vitro-Bio Research Institute, Issoire, France; LipiGesic M, PuraMed BioScience, Inc., Schofield, WI; GelStat Migraine, GelStat Corporation) shows that taking feverfew by mouth can reduce the frequency of migraine headaches and reduce pain, nausea, vomiting, and sensitivity to light and noise when they do occur. 


Feverfew may be more effective in people with more frequent migraine attacks. But there are some studies that concluded that feverfew doesn't work for migraines. The difference in results may be explained by the differences in feverfew products that were tested. The Canadian government allows manufacturers of a certain feverfew formulation containing 0.2% of a chemical called parthenolide) to claim that their product can be used to prevent migraines.

PROCEDURES ON TAKING FEVERFEW 

Feverfew can be made into a hot drink by decocting the leaves into boiling water.  

  • Use 1-2 teaspoons per cup of boiling water 
  • Steep for 3-10 minutes depending on taste
  • Feverfew Tincture can be added to water or fruit juice and taken daily.
  • Traditionally Taken: 2-3ml taken 2-3 times per day, or as directed by a Herbal Practitioner.

IN CONCLUSION

Feverfew has been of tremendous usage. With a long history of traditional use, the Ancient Greek physician Dioscorides gave a decoction of Feverfew to women in labor to speed up the birth process by increasing contractions. The Romans used it as an emmenagogue, to induce or increase menstrual flow and they also used it during difficult births to aid in the expulsion of the placenta. It gained notoriety as a remedy for migraines after the wife of a Welsh doctor described how she used it to end a 50-year struggle with these debilitating headaches. It is reported that she ate three Feverfew leaves per day for 10 months, over which time her migraines disappeared completely. This has triggered many studies being undertaken by the scientific community on Feverfew as an aid to migraine and some other preventions.